Youth Programs

Cub Scouts

What is Cub Scouting?

Cub Scouting means “doing.” Cub Scouting is a year-round family program designed to have the boys doing things such as citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness.

Who is Cub Scouts for?

Boys in 1st – 5th grades (ages 6 – 10)

How is Cub Scouts organized?

Cub Scouts are organized by grade levels into “ranks” and “dens”, and are led by adult leaders. The “dens” together with the adult leaders and the committee form the “pack”.

  1. Bobcats

    – All Grades (1st – 5th) – the first rank for all boys who join Cub Scouting

  2. Tiger Cub

    – 1st grade (6 years old)a. Must be under the age of 8, have completed kindergarten or be in the first grade, or be age
    The Tiger Cub program is for first-grade boys and their adult partners. There are five Tiger Cub achievement areas. The Tiger Cub, working with his adult partner, completes 15 requirements within these areas to earn the Tiger Cub badge. These requirements consist of an exciting series of indoor and outdoor activities just right for a boy in the first grade.

  3. Wolf

    – 2nd grade (7 years old)a. Must have completed first grade but not completed second grade, or be age 8.
    The Wolf program is for boys who have completed first grade. To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass 12 achievements involving simple physical and mental skills.

  4. Bear

    – 3rd grade (8 years old)a. Must have completed second grade but not completed third grade, or be age 9.
    The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade. There are 24 Bear achievements in four categories. The Cub Scout must complete 12 of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are somewhat more difficult and challenging than those for Wolf rank.

  5. Webelos

    – 4th grade (9 years old)a. Must have completed third grade but not completed fifth grade, or be age 10 but not yet 11 1/2.
    This program is for boys who have completed third grade. A boy may begin working on the Webelos badge as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Handbook, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements—all leading to the Arrow of Light Award.

  6. Arrow of Light

    – 5th grade (10 years old) a. Must have completed third grade but not completed fifth grade, or be age 10 but not yet 11 1/2.
    This program is for boys who have completed fourth grade. A boy may begin working on the Arrow of Light Rank as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Handbook, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements—all leading to the Arrow of Light Rank

Each of the ranks is earned by completing age appropriate activities and requirements, and by demonstrating a willingness to behave according to the ideals of Cub Scouting. When a boy completes the Cub Scouting program he is ready for the next step, Boy Scouting!

Advancement Plan

Recognition is important to young boys. The Cub Scouting advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn badges, and strengthens family understanding as adult family members work with boys on advancement projects.

Activities

Many of the activities happen right in the den and pack.
Cub Scout Academics and Sports
The Cub Scout Academics and Sports program provides the opportunity for boys to learn new techniques, increase scholarship skills, develop sportsmanship, and have fun. Participation in the program allows boys to be recognized for physical fitness and talent-building activities.

Camping

Age-appropriate camping programs are packed with theme-oriented action that brings Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts into the great out-doors. Day camping comes to the boy in neighborhoods across the country; resident camping is at least a three-day experience in which Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp within a developed theme of adventure and excitement.

 

Cub Scout Promise

I, (name), promise to do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
To help other people, and
To obey the Law of the Pack.

Cub Scout Motto

Do Your Best.

Tiger Cub Motto

Search, Discover, Share.

Law of the Pack

The Cub Scout follows Akela.
The Cub Scout helps the pack go.
The pack helps the Cub Scout grow.
The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Colors

The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold.
– Blue – truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above
– Gold – warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness
Together, they symbolize what Cub Scouting is all about.

School Night

Click here for more Information.

Boy Scouts

What is Boy Scouting?

The Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship, and personal fitness training for youth.
Lord Robert Baden-Powell often said that “scouting is a game with a purpose!” Scouting activities are organized around activities that boys enjoy but structured in a such a way to achieve the aims of scouting:

Be A Scout click here to find something in your area!

Boy Scout Program Membership

Your son can be a Scout if he has completed the fifth grade and is at least 10 years old or is age 11 or has earned the Arrow of Light Awared and is at least 10 years old, but has not reached age 18.

Volunteer Scouters

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Boy Scouting program. They serve in a variety of jobs — everything from unit leaders to chairmen of troop committees, committee members, merit badge counselors, and chartered organization representatives.

Aims and Methods of the Scouting Program

The Scouting program has three specific objectives, commonly referred to as the “Aims of Scouting”: character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness. The methods by which the aims are achieved are listed below in random order to emphasize the equal importance of each.

Ideals

The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. The Boy Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what and who he becomes.
Patrols
The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where members can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through elected representatives.

Outdoor Programs

Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. In the outdoors the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for the beauty of the world around us.

Advancement

Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence.

Associations with Adults

Boys learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of the troop. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to boys, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives.

Personal Growth

As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn.

Leadership Development

The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership role of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

Uniform

The uniform makes the Boy Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Boy Scout’s commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting.

Summer Camp

“Summer Camp” is the highlight of the year for many Scout programs! Camp MK Brown Scout Camp is the summer resident camping program for Boy Scouts. Six-day sessions, Sunday to Saturday, are offered during June.

Sea Scouts

What is Sea Scouts?

“For more information about the Sea Scouts, including how to join a Sea Scout ship, please contact Brian Lamirande at 806-358-6500.”

Sea Scouts is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are at least 13 years of age and have completed the eighth grade or is 14 years of age and not yet 21. Must have parent/guardian approval if under 18 years of age.

Sea Scouts is a specialized segment of the Venturing program, which was organized to address member’s boating skills and promote knowledge of our maritime heritage.


Sea Scout units, called “ships,” focus on sailing and cruising either sailboats or power vessels. During the boating season, Sea Scouts learn to maintain and operate then vessel, with a focus on learning the safe and proper methods of handling boats. Sea Scouts also learn the meaning of buoys and lights, how to take advantage of wind and tide, and how to drop anchor or approach a dock.

Most ships hold formal meetings, conducted in either full dress of work uniforms. Swimming, lifesaving, first aid, Coast Guard Auxiliary Sailing and Seamanship, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses are taught with the ship by our own officers. The Texas state safe boating course is also offered by many ships. Occasionally movies are shown, contests between crews are held, or intership visits are arranged.

For more infomration about the Sea Scouts, including how to join a Sea Scout ship,
please contact Brian Lamirande at 806-358-6500.

You may also go to BSA Sea Scout: www.seascout.org or BSA’s Florida Sea Base: www.bsaseabase.org.

Venturing

What is Venturing?

Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are at least 13 years of age and have completed the eighth grade or is 14 years of age and not yet 21. Must have parent/guardian approval if under 18 years of age.

Venturing’s purpose is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Venturing is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth, adult leaders, and organizations in their communities.

Local community organizations establish a Venturing crew by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of exciting and meaningful activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow, develop leadership skills, and become good citizens.

Venturing is a youth led program supported by adult advisors. Crews elect their own officers and select, plan, and carry out their own program of activities. Crew membership may be co-ed, boys, or girls. Every crew member is expected to learn, practice, and teach others as they grow in the program.

Leadership

All Venturers are given opportunities to learn and apply proven leadership skills. A Venturing crew is led by elected crew officers.

Group Activities

Venturing activities are interdependent group experiences in which success is dependent on the cooperation of all. Learning by doing in a group setting provides opportunities for developing new skills.

Adult Association

The youth officers lead the crew. The officers and activity chairs work closely with adult Advisors and other adult leaders in a spirit of partnership. The adults serve in a “shadow” leader capacity.

Recognition

Recognition comes through the Venturing advancement program and through the acknowledgement of a youth’s competence and ability by peers and adults.

The Ideals

Venturers are expected to know and live by the Venturing Oath and Code. They promise to be faithful in religious duties, treasure their American heritage, to help others, and to seek truth and fairness.

High Adventure

Venturing’s emphasis on high adventure helps provide team-building opportunities, new meaningful experiences, practical leadership application, and lifelong memories to young adults.

Teaching Others

All of the Venturing awards require Venturers to teach what they have learned to others. When they teach others often, Venturers are better able to retain the skill or knowledge they taught, they gain confidence in their ability to speak and relate to others, and they acquire skills that can benefit them for the rest of their lives as a hobby or occupation.

Ethics in Action

An important goal of Venturing is to help young adults be responsible and caring people, both now and in the future. Venturing uses “ethical controversies” to help young adults develop the ability to make responsible choices that reflect their concern for what is a risk and how it will affect others involved. Because an ethical controversy is a problem-solving situation, leaders expect young adults to employ empathy, invention, and selection when they think through their position and work toward a solution of an ethical controversy.

Crew Activities

What a Venturing crew does is limited only by the imagination and involvement of the adult and youth leaders and members of the crew. Some examples are: sail the Caribbean , produce a play, or climb a mountain.

Uniforms

Each crew may determine what, if any, specific uniform pants or shorts they will wear based on crew activities.

What is Exploring?

Exploring is Learning for Life’s career education program for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) or 15 to 21 years old. There are also middle school Exploring clubs for those who are in 6th, 7th or 8th grade. Exploring’s purpose is to provide experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Explorers are ready to investigate the meaning of interdependence in their personal relationships and communities.

Adults are selected by the participating organization for involvement in the program. Color, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic background, economic status, and citizenship are not criteria for participation.

Exploring is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth and the organizations in their communities. Local community organizations initiate an Explorer post by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow, and develop.

Explorer posts can specialize in a variety of career skills. Exploring programs are based on five areas of emphasis: career opportunities, life skills, citizenship, character education, and leadership experience.

Contact us for more information about joining or starting an Exploring post.